University of Southern California

Morsut Lab

USC Stem Cell

Employment

Mentoring and training the next generation of creative scientists and inventors in the field at the intersection of synthetic biology, developmental and stem cell biology is a top priority of the Morsut Lab. Our goal is to help each and every lab member fulfill their maximum potential. All lab members will have the opportunity to investigate questions that interest them and to give and receive mentorship to others in the lab. For more details, see the Morsut Lab Philosophy page.

If you are looking for a position as a postdoc, please send an email to us (morsut@usc.edu, and copy mburrill@usc.edu) with a cover letter describing your past and future projects, career goals, what you hope to get out of the Morsut Lab and what you hope to bring to the Morsut Lab.  Please enclose your CV and the names, emails and phone numbers of three or more references.

If you are a USC graduate student looking for a lab, email me (morsut@usc.edu) and we can set up a time to meet. We always have room for inspired rotation students to discover their talents!  Motivation, enthusiasm and curiosity required.

If you are looking for a graduate student position in the Morsut Lab and are not currently at USC, you will need to apply to either the Programs in Biomedical and Biological Sciences (PIBBS) or the Biomedical Engineering (BME) PhD program at USC.

If you are currently a USC student looking for a UROP, please email me (morsut@usc.edu) with your prior experience, any relevant course work and a rough estimate of how much time you plan to spend in the lab.

Projects

Potential projects in the lab include:

  1. engineering synthetic mechanotransduction pathways;
  2. simulating and engineering multicellular networks of morphogenesis in fibroblasts for synthetic elongation, cavitation and multi-axis differentiation;
  3. engineering cardiovascular organoids;
  4. engineering therapeutic cells for neurodegenerative disease and arthritis; and
  5. engineering functional self-organizing organoids from the bottom-up.

Thank you for your interest!

Leonardo and the Morsut Lab